Vivi Nilssen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) vivi.l.nilssen@ntnu.no

A multitude of studies show that children’s knowledge at an early age is essential for future success in school. There is, however, great differences across the world on what would be the best teaching of mathematics for young learners. This concerns both how it should be performed, what the content should be and what aims there should be – and even if there should be aims. At NORMA11 there was a working group discussing young children (0-10) and mathematics. One of the conclusions from this group was that this is a growing field in the Nordic countries with a multitude of theoretical perspectives and research methods. However, there are few papers in the proceedings from NORMA11 and NORMA14 focusing on young learners and mathematics.

For this symposium, we have consciously brought together researchers focusing on mathematics in the last years of kindergarten/preschool and in the first grades in school, age 5-10. The papers in the symposium take different foci, use different methods, and they are located within different theoretical frameworks. They will therefore make an important contribution to understand more about teaching of young learners.

The symposium builds on four papers and one short communication:

Jorryt van Bommel (Karlstad University) and Hanna Palmér (Linnaeus University)

Paper or and digital a study on combinatorics in preschool class

Lisa Björklund Boistrup and Anna-Karin Nordin (Stockholm University)

Multimodality as an approach for studying arguments in mathematics teaching with younger students

Frode Rønning (NTNU, Trondheim)

Interpreting combinatorial problems as multiplicative structures

Heidi Dahl, Torunn Klemp and Vivi Nilssen (NTNU, Trondheim)

Collaborative tool-mediated talk – an example from third graders

Anna Wernberg (Malmö University)

Mathematical questions to enhance learning in a preschool class (short communication)

 

Discussants: Martin Carlsen (University of Agder) and Raymond Bjuland (University of Stavanger)